Father Mark, Reflections

Asking the Right Question II

Incense represents an offering to God and an image of the Divine Mystery that we cannot grasp.

Years ago, I taught a two weekend 38 hour listening skills course for church members around our diocese “called “The Calling and Caring Ministry. I recall a statement taught in the class that I had never thought of before: “The answer you get is the question you sent.”

The crux of the matter is that if I am asking a question, I am the one responsible for “languaging” the question so that the listener can understand it to the point that they may give a clear response. If the person doesn’t understand the question it’s mostly my fault in communicating the question clearly to them.

Our questions often reveal the level of our own understanding of the depth of complexity that we address. Jesus’ disciples were notorious for asking questions that were unrelated to where Jesus was attempting to lead them. Matthew 20 tells the story of a mother who asks Jesus if her two sons can sit on the right and left of him in his kingdom. Poor insight. The need to feel important, more important than others reveals one’s spiritual poverty. Then there’s the story of the disciples arguing in Luke 9, “Who is the greatest? Until one is immersed within by the acceptance and love of God, one will hunger for worth and importance. Being one with God dissolves the need for rank. In john 9, the disciples ask Jesus, whether the fault was the man’s or his parents’ for the reason he was born blind. Instead of looking at whose at fault, why not look at what it might take to heal the man? In Mark 13 the disciples ask when Jesus would return again during the end of the age, wanting to know, “When?” Jesus tells them that it’s not for them to know. Human beings have a canny habit of wanting to know when everything is going to happen as it gives us the illusion that we’re in control of our lives, safety, others and other things.

Our questions also reveal our level of understanding. After dialoguing with Pilate, Pilate asked Jesus, “What is truth?” Pilate was looking for a definition or facts. Jesus was Living Truth in Pilate’s midst that Pilate could not realize.

There is sometimes a reason for our questions as they can reveal our agenda behind wanting to know the details of what’s coming. When we know the details, we think we feel secure, thus losing our true security in being one with the Spirit. Knowing God is our security, not the details.

Now I’m not saying any of this is easy. We so often seek security instead of God, desiring security more than God. It’s really difficult to let go of this and it’s never a one time event. “Letting go” and relying on God alone is a daily event into which we are invited in the moments of each day.

What are our questions really asking? Listen beyond the words to the spirit and intention behind them. And then ask God to help us release those questions into the most important question of all: “Lord, will you help me to want you and desire you above all other things? Will you heal my conflicted heart and become One with me? Will you manifest your presence within me to the extent that I too can say with Jesus, “The Father and I are One.”

Amen.