Father Mark, Sermons

It’s Sorting Out Time

Pentecost Last; Mt 25:31 ff; 11/23/20

We all go through times of sorting things out—what do we keep and what do we get rid of?   Jesus’ story is about sorting out—sorting out sheep from the goats.  How can one tell the difference? 

Goats and sheep in Jesus’ time grazed together.  Both are needed for the resources they provide—hair from goats and wool from sheep while both provide milk and cheese. 

When it came time for feeding, the sheep would be separated into a sheep fold while the goats would be sent into a field.   The sheep would be fed fine grass while the goats would continue to graze off the land.  Sheep are the ones that were given real food.

Back in that time, breeding wasn’t a science like it is now and the distinction between sheep and goats weren’t as visibly apparent.  Sorting sheep from goats is discerned by their behavior.   So let’s look at the difference. 

Sorting goats:  I learned what I know about goats from the late John Farqueson from Junction who sorted me out on goats.   As I drove up the dirt road to his ranch I saw a goat standing on top of the cab of his pickup—not good for the paint job, I thought.  John was in the goat pen with several goats around him.  I saw a goat ease up on the side of John.  The goat then stepped out in front of him and a moment later he turned 180 degrees and rammed right into him, almost knocking him over.  Goats are spontaneous, impulsive and unpredictable.

Sorting out sheep—they tend to clump together—but will stray off from the others.   Sheep are nearly blind so they can eat their way apart from the flock becoming lost.  Sheep use the master’s voice as a homing device to find their way to become found again. 

Sorting out sheep from goats can be witnessed in how the shepherd works them. 

Shepherds lead sheep from alongside them.  One usually sees goat herders chasing the impulsive wandering goats.

We all have goat and sheep within us.   How can we sort out the difference? 

The sheep part of us is oriented and balanced coming from our hearing and following the master’s voice.   This is the key difference.  Sheep listen to their master’s voice.  The goat side of us listens to our own voice and thus become more self-referencing, impulsive and reactive.

So our question is, which voice brings harmony and life—the master’s or my own?  Can we sort out which voice we’re hearing?   What voice or voices do I hear me?  Do I experience harmony or discord?   Can we hear the voice of Jesus moving through us? 

Sometimes it’s difficult to see the Christ in others.   Sometimes it’s easy to find the weakness in others rather than the beauty such as in the hungry, sick and the prisoner.  We’re all prisoners of something you know.

One of the greatest challenges for the Church is to know the One Voice who reveals our soul.  Only then can we see the Christ in others instead of focusing on their unpleasantries. 

This large wafer is called the priest’s host.  In a few minutes we’ll prayer for Christ to become present for us in the breaking of the bread.   Christ is our host for himself.  By receiving Christ, the host, we become hosts for the living Christ ourselves.  As living hosts for Christ, Jesus comes through us to touch all that cross our paths during the week.  To become and remain hosts for Christ, we like sheep must receive the Master’s Voice so that it his voice and not ours that comes through us. 

We are living hosts for the living Christ.  By being carried by Christ we carry Christ to others.   Be who you are—the hosts of Christ.

Amen.